You Don’t Need to Have Gone Though any Spiritual or Religious Training to Bless People, Places, or Things Around You.

We all have the power to send a blessing to another person, a specific area or to things (like food) before we eat it.  You don’t need to be religious, belong to a certain church or even have any specific religious or spiritual training to send a blessing. You can simple asked that something be “blessed” or you can ask that God/Source, Angels and even Spirit Guides bless…(fill in the blank.)

When you “bless” another person, place or thing, you raise its vibration. And, not that we are looking for anything in return, but when we send a blessing, we also raise our own vibration.

Recently, when illness, violence and fear started to spread during the Covid Pandemic and the riots in the city of Chicago, I would go for a walk each morning and send a blessing. When I got to the park that I consider to be the center of my neighborhood, I would picture a ball of light. I would ask “God, Angels and My Spirit Guides to… “Please bless and protect my neighborhood, my town, my county, my state, my country and the world from illness, violence, hate, and fear.” As I did this, I would picture the white light going out in a spiral, and I would visualize it first covering my town, my county, then the state, the United States, and then the entire globe. I did also say the town’s name, along with the county and state’s name, but there is no wrong way to send a blessing. When I was done asking for the blessing, I would say “thank you” or “and so it is.”

When it came to the above-mentioned blessing, I did ask assistance from God, Angels, and my Spirit Guides most of the time, but there were times that I also asked Mother Mary to assist, and I called upon Jesus Christ, as well. Again, there is no wrong way to send a blessing, just like there isn’t a wrong way to pray. My mentors have always taught me that as long as the intention is there, all is fine.

be blessedHere are some other examples on how to send a blessing:

  • As you say goodbye to someone, you can wish them to “Have a blessed day!” or “Bless your heart!”
  • Before you eat, you can say out loud or in your head, “Bless this food!
  • Maybe you see someone out in public, or at work who is going through something or struggling with something. In your head, you can say, “Bless that person.”
  • You can also ask that animals and geographic locations be blessed.
  • You can send a blessing to buildings, such as to schools. An example would be “Please bless and protect (i.e. School) and all of the students and staff who are there.”
  • You can also send a blessing to your children, family members and your friends.

The list can go on and on….

If this resonates with you, or you feel the pull to do so, try sending a blessing to someone or something today. When you are done, see if anything feels lighter or different to you.

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Forty Ways to Keep Busy

spending timeQuarantine for many is terrifying. Maybe you are finding yourself with more time on your hands than what you are used to?   Maybe you feel that you have less time? Time is a gift and we get to choose how we use it. Here is a list of 40 things that you can do to honor the time that you have been given.

  1. Get plenty of rest. (Rest keeps your body and mind healthy and strong.)
  2. Bake something. If you make a double batch, share with someone. Baking can also help with stress as some find it to be calming and soothing.
  3. Be present. To be present means to have your focus, your attention, your thoughts you’re your feelings all on the task is at hand. You are present when you let go of the past and you don’t focus on the future.
  4. Check-in with family, friends, and neighbors to see how they are doing. You can see if anybody needs anything.
  5. Clean your home, vehicle, and garage. A messy, dirty, or cluttered space can make a person feel anxious and less focused.
  6. De-clutter cabinets, drawers and closets. Clutter is nothing but unprocessed memories. Clear the clutter and give what you no longer need away. If you aren’t able to donate items, put them aside in a box and when you hear of someone needing something, go to that box and give  what is in need away.
  7. Detox your social media feeds and contacts. You are what you read and come in contact with every day. Social media is a magnet for negativity and fear and it has the ability to ignite panic and false information at an exponential rate. Protect your own energy and mental state by unfriending, un-following, hiding posts and/or muting people who spread negativity and fear into your world.
  8. Educate yourself on how to preserve food.
  9. Email or call local non-profit organizations in your area and ask how you can be of assistance.
  10. Establish a community garden where you live.
  11. Exercise your intuition and learn to trust it. We all have intuition. Gut feelings are intuition.
  12. Fill your home or space with positive energy. Play music, open the windows to let fresh air in, pull back the curtains to let natural light flow in, invite nature in with houseplants, hang things that make you happy, or add some color around you.
  13. Find a personal mantra or daily prayer that you can say when you get up in the morning or throughout your day. A personal mantra is an affirmation to motivate and inspire you to be your best self. It is typically a positive phrase or statement that you use to affirm the way you want to live your life.
  14. Find things or do things that make you laugh.
  15. Get familiar old fashioned remedies that you already have in your cabinets with things like apple cider vinegar, coconut oil, baking soda, cinnamon and turmeric (to name a few).
  16. Get moving! Exercise, walk, move your body or dance.
  17. If you are religious, use this time to strengthen your relationship with your God/Creator. If you are spiritual, use this time to strengthen your spirituality.
  18. If/when you start planting your garden, plant a little extra for neighbors and strangers.
  19. Incorporate gratitude into your day. Go for a walk and in your head think about what you are grateful for, or before you go to bed at night, recite a list and give thanks for what you are grateful for.
  20. Incorporate uplifting sound into your day through music, chanting or church hymns.
  21. If you have children, have them journal as well.
  22. Learn deep breathing techniques. Deep breathing can decrease stress, stimulate the lymphatic system and increase both immunity and energy.
  23. Learn to meditate. Meditation clears the mind, calms the body and helps with decision making.
  24. Look around your home for ways you can scale back on your water and electrical use.
  25. Observe how much food you waste and make changes accordingly.
  26. Offer support to first responders, hospital workers, and public health officials in your area.
  27. Organize old family photos. (If you have children, teach them about relatives in old photos.)
  28. Read the books you have never started. Re-read books that you already have read.
  29. Reconnect your body to the earth. This is also known as grounding (or earthing). Grounding neutralizes free radicals. One way to ground is to walk barefoot outside.
  30. Research and get familiar with the term “Mutual Aid.” Imagine living it.
  31. Search your home for items that you can fix or repurpose instead of throwing away.
  32. Share whatever you have with another.
  33. Smile at others.
  34. Spend time outside in nature.
  35. Start something you have always wanted to start like a hobby, an organization or a skill set.
  36. Take the time to write a letter or send a card to somebody who matters to you. Teach your children how to write a letter or note and mail it off.
  37. Teach yourself to play an instrument.
  38. Throw your weight behind anyone willing to take on difficulty for the well-being of the collective.
  39. Unsubscribe from email and mail solicitations that you no longer need or want.
  40. Use this time to release grudges and forgive those who you think have wronged you.

How are you spending your time? Drop me a line or comment below to let me know.

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Parents: At What Age do you Stop going to your Child’s Bus Stop?

My children are still in grade school and they take the bus to school. Our stop has a variety of children from kindergarten to sixth grade taking the bus. Some other parents (or grandparents, or babysitters) congregate at the bus stop, while others can’t, or choose not to.  I am fortunate enough that my schedule allows me to be at the bus stop with them in the mornings. On days that I can’t make it to the stop, I usually send a text to another parent or two asking them to please keep an eye on my children and to please let me know if they are doing anything that is inappropriate in my absence. (It takes a village!)  I also know a handful of parents seem surprised that I still go down to the stop nearly every morning.

Like many kids, my children tell me that I don’t need to go to the bus stop with them. In fact, some moms of older kids tell me that it is “un-cool” to be at the bus stop. Part of me would love to not have to leave the house, especially in the cold or the rain, but the other half of me, continually hears and sees things at the bus stop that usually lead to a conversation that needs to be had after the kids get home from school, or during dinner conversation. (As many others, my kids are a continual work-in-progress and continually need to be molded and taught how to be respectable human beings.)

Sure, kids will be kids, but right when I think I don’t need to, or shouldn’t go down to the stop anymore, something happens, or is said, that leads me to believe I still need to be around and address things with my children.

My concerns can sometimes have to do with safety issues like “Get out of the street while you are waiting for the bus!”

I have heard kids using words like “gay” in an inappropriate context, or trying to “school others” of what it means to be gay – many time in front of younger and impressionable ears with wrong information being provided.

Recently another child used the word “racist” in a negative way as he stated that he “wanted to watch something on his phone that was racist.” Also said in front of impressionable ears.

The other day I saw an unattended child licking rocks. (I can’t make this up.)  She thought she was being cute and said that they tasted like saw dust. Some of us parents tried to discourage her by telling her that they were dirty, but that didn’t stop her.

Many kids have devices these days, as do many kids at our stop, (mine still don’t – I know, that makes me “un-cool” again!) and I have seen them on their phones discussing how they are registering for things that they need to be over the age of 18 for. As a reminder, a few of these children are 12, but many are younger. (Chalk that up to different rules, different families, I guess.)

In the past I’ve heard children at our stop talk about world events and tragedies in heartless and at times, brash tones. They are children and have a lot to learn, and families address such events in different ways in their own homes, but I have found myself chiming in to these conversations when necessary.

I’ve seen a young child at our stop take things like fruit out of his or her lunch box and throw it at other children. Once it is thrown, it is left on the ground unless another parent suggests that it gets picked up.

Perhaps my bus stop is one of the worst ones in town? (Probably not.)

Or maybe all bus stops have a little of this going on? (Probably so.)

Kids will be kids, but I feel that they are continually a work-in-progress and they need pruning along the way.

 I don’t know about you, but I choose to continue to be an “un-cool” parent and keep my eyes and ears on my children as well as those around them – At least for a little longer.

So I ask, “At What Age do you Stop going to your Child’s Bus Stop?” You can reply in the comments section below or join the discussion on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/JoinTheDiscussionCoffeeConversationTransformation/